Hybridity in the Comoros

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The Comoro Black Flying Fox: endangered mystical creature

Come and hang out on islands of shifting majesty. Comorian musicians blend Arabic, African, French and global genres with a multiplicity of languages. Can you say pev̄o?!

In particular, Afro-Sufi musician Nawal is a groove-inflected force for peace:

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Seychelles Seychelles by the Seashore

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It takes the Aldabra Tortoise 3 hours to yawn

To the land of ancient tortoises and giant nuts! Seychelles also has some pretty groovy sega music, and mouggae, and waltzes… all sung in the wonderful Seychellois kreol. Check it silvouple:

Oh and about those nuts – they really are the heaviest in the world, and in the old days when they would travel across the ocean and land on far away shores, people just didn’t know what the heck to think.

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The Coco de Mer: a big nut that looks like a butt

This week’s global bangers & mash contains many more sonic surprises:

 

 

The Smokin’ Strings of Kenya

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I have returned from a stellar and fruitful and beautiful journey to Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize – and thus the radio show is back for the first episode of 2016!  The first hour features exciting new music from China, Argentina, Thailand, Belize and other Earth-based locales..

The second hour takes us on a historical safari to Kenya, a land where elephants and stringed instruments roam supreme.  The guitar and nyatiti form the backbone of most Kenyan music, and singular styles have flourished here for many musical generations. But the real soul of modern Kenyan music is a genre called Benga, which draws on Congolese Rumba and takes it in new hyperkinetic directions.  This music is pure joy.. you just gotta let it in!

Harmonic Soulstice

As people in the northern parts of the planet begin to anticipate the return of the sun, here is a wacky and wonderful animated video from Ethiopia (middle-earth) that will warm even the farthest polar-dwellers:

Happy Solstice to all!  It has become easy to forget that Christmas and many other religious celebrations began as a way of deepening our connection with the natural world and its rhythmic cycles; remember this to stay grounded during the mad festival of consumption that we still call holy-days.  Let us sync back into the planet’s rhythms and swim in the harmonies.