Sardinian Rock through the Ages

sardenia rocks

Who built the nuraghes? Probably ancient humans using anti-gravity. Or dinosaurs.

The mystical Mediterranean island of Sardinia is covered with over 7000 megalithic rock sites that date back at least 3000 years. If the magical people who made these structures had electric guitars and distortion pedals, I bet this is the kind of slow and heavy music they would have played in those temples…

It’s a metal stereotype to be associated with pre-Christian paganism, but somehow it just feels right. Like a protest against the single-minded pursuit of forward progress, time dissolves in a musical trance. May the earth-shaking riffs wake the ancient wizards!

Hear Sardinian rock amidst many other local and global sounds as we visit the secret music scene of a singular giant isle:

Advertisements

¡GLOBAL HORROR 2017!

BNY-Marimba-Player-DB392

Prepare to have your pants/shorts/socks scared right off. This right here is the spookiest/strangest/stickiest Hallowe’en playlist you will hear all year and well into the afterlife. Featuring appearances by some of Earth’s greatest monsters – including El Tunche, sabertoothed tigers, oodles of ghouls, spiders, drones, gangsters, Jamaican vampires and slime.

Meet Delicate Steve

Thrilled to have American guitar superhero Steve Marion on the show as he cruises through Vancouver on tour, saving the world from uninspired guitar playing. Heck, he even gives online lessons via Guitar World. Check out the interview here:

From his new record This is Steve, the great Segway road trip of Tomorrow:

Inspired by Steve Marion’s guitar lyricism, the second hour of the program features a bevy of instrumental bands of many kinds – where the human voice is replaced with human hands.

Pioneering Women in Music

In all styles, in all places, there are strong women who craft songs just as well as the fellas. In celebration of International Women’s Day 2016, we present a playlist of great female composers and performers – from the big band era to the present – who breached the status quo to share their art, and in the process have divined a more equal world:

Ancient Thunder Dragon Beats

Bhutanese dance groupTashi Delek!  Welcome to the last Shangri-La, the magical moutain kingdom of Bhutan.  Yes, they still have a king – and he is on Facebook.  Wedged in the Himalayas between the two most populous nations on Earth, the land of thunder dragons somehow manages to keep a very low profile and a well-preserved cultural identity.  Miraculously, television wasn’t legalized in Bhutan until 1999, so they were essentially the last country to leave the real world and be hypnotized by the warm electric glow.  Tragic, but inevitable.

Bhutan is so special because it represents the preservation of ancient Tibetan Buddhist culture, now that Tibet has been wiped out by China.  Bhutan was united as a nation in the 17th century by runaway Tibetan lama Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, and has since evolved in isolation.  Perched safely in cliff-side dzongs, the Bhutanese are one of the very few societies to have successfully resisted occupation from outside powers for their entire history.

Taktsang Palphug Monastery, with ample parking for up to 6 thunder dragons

Taktsang Palphug Monastery, with ample parking for up to 6 thunder dragons

Until the last few decades, only traditional (really just another word for ‘local’) music existed in Bhutan.  All traditional music can be divided into Boedra (Tibetan style) or Zhungdra (developed in Bhutan).  This stuff is sacred.  And then there’s rock n roll..

Sure, it’s pretty positive stuff.  So is everything on the young Thimphu-based record label M-Studio. But where will they be in another 20 years?  Death metal thrash dub-step polka?  For now, Bhutan teeters the line between ancient depth and innocent modernity.  May they retain their uniqueness, and dragons; forever.

Hear the soundscape of Bhutan {{HERE}}