Fine Works of the Earthen People

earth-drum
2018 was a year. There was more humanity in the world than ever before. It was wild. But the people made some brilliant sonic documents that just might outlive their creators. Here is a supremely subjective best-of-2018 music mix, blatantly ignoring all other best-of list. Mostly obscure music from far away that I think is exciting. Hope you hear something fresh (PLAYLIST HERE). Bless the creators out there!

And look here, an uncut dance mix!

Secret Sounds of Turkmenistan

Turkménistan-amitié

The sparkling city of Ashgabat

Welcome to Turkmenistan, the oddest and most mysterious of the Stans. East of the Caspian Sea, Turkmenistan is a strangely modern and strangely administered nation. Hear some of the classic folks sounds (thanks dutar.com), some freaky prog jazz, hip hop, and more:

door to hell

The door to hell is inconveniently located in the middle of the Karakum Desert

¡GLOBAL HORROR 2017!

BNY-Marimba-Player-DB392

Prepare to have your pants/shorts/socks scared right off. This right here is the spookiest/strangest/stickiest Hallowe’en playlist you will hear all year and well into the afterlife. Featuring appearances by some of Earth’s greatest monsters – including El Tunche, sabertoothed tigers, oodles of ghouls, spiders, drones, gangsters, Jamaican vampires and slime.

Sounds like 17,000 islands

travel advice Indonesia-Raja-Ampat-Papua

Trip to the music of Indonesia, where traditions like the otherworldly Gamelan orchestra blend with modern sounds to manifest waves you never dreamed of!

Yes there are 17,000 islands in Indonesia, and some believe that the lost city of Atlantis is hidden somewhere beneath the Indonesian sea. What a fun idea! Did they play Gamelan? Did they have electric guitars? Maybe this band would have been tops of the Atlantean pops:

From the first hour, a world of new music:

Manx to the Future!

isleofmanspace

Clear skies over the Isle of Man

Resting calmly in the eye of the UK, the Isle of Man hosts a surprising storm of folk and progressive sounds. The Manx language is also experiencing a triumphant rebirth, thanks in part to the weird wonders of social media. Hear Manx music of all stripes in this week’s far-out soundscape:

And here, a (not particularly clear) recording of the last known native speaker of the Manx language, Ned Maddrell: